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Tuesday, May 30, 2017

EYEDROPS IN PLACE OF AVASTIN IN WET MACULAR DEGENERATION

University of Birmingham develops revolutionary eye drops to treat age-related blindness
University of Birmingham Medical News

The results of collaborative research, published in the journal Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, could spell the end of painful injections for age–related macular degeneration (AMD).

Scientists led by biochemist Dr Felicity de Cogan, from the University of Birmingham’s Institute of Inflammation and Aging, have invented a method of delivering the injected drug as an eye drop instead, and their laboratory research has obtained the same outcomes as the injected drug.

BIOMARKER PREDICTS VISION LOSS

Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis News

Research in mice and patients suggests biomarker could predict vision loss.

Studying mouse models of glaucoma, Ban, Apte and their colleagues identified a molecule in the eye called growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15), noting that the levels of the molecule increased as the animals aged and developed optic nerve damage.

"comparing the fluid from patients without glaucoma to those with glaucoma, the GDF15 biomarker was significantly elevated in the glaucoma patients,” Apte said. “We also found that higher levels of the molecule were associated with worse functional outcomes, so this biomarker seems to correlate with disease severity.”

Apte and Ban don’t believe that the molecule causes cells in the retina to die; rather, that it is a marker of stress in retinal cells.

VITAMIN K1 REDUCES RISK OF CATARACTS

(HealthDay)—High intake of vitamin K1 is associated with reduced risk of cataracts, according to a study published online May 11 in JAMA Ophthalmology.
"High intake of dietary vitamin K1 was associated with a  of cataracts in an elderly Mediterranean population even after adjusting by other potential confounders," the authors write.

LATANOPROST AND MYOPIC PROGRESSION

It has been shown that form deprivation stimulates axial length growth and hence myopia.  In a study presented at the annual meeting of ARVO, young guinea pigs undergoing form deprivation were administered either daily latanoprost or daily vehicle for 12 weeks.  Those that received vehicle had a .18 mm axial length increase vs. a .01mm axial length increase in the latanoprost group.  This suggests there may be a possibility that daily topical latanoprost may help stop progression of myopia, offering a potential new treatment for the condition. 

Pain reliever may help relieve the vision damage of glaucoma


Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University News
Researchers want to know if the powerful pain medicine (+)–pentazocine can help avoid the damage from glaucoma. 
Their focus is astrocytes that normally nourish and protect retinal ganglion cells, at the juncture where the optic nerve sends visual information to the brain so we can see. Glaucoma appears to change the relationship between these two brain cell types so that astrocytes move from supportive to destructive mode.
“The theory is that in glaucoma, astrocytes (which normally nourish and protect the retina), become toxic to neurons,” said Dr. Kathryn Bollinger, glaucoma specialist at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University.
The research team has evidence that treatment with (+)–pentazocine calms the astrocytes, prompting them to release brain–derived neurotrophic factor, known to promote healthy survival of neurons.

Thursday, May 04, 2017

NEUROSTIMULATOR FOR DRY EYE

According the the American Academy of Ophthalmology:

The FDA approved TrueTear, an intranasal tear neurostimulator device designed to temporarily increase tear production in adult patients.

The handheld stimulator comes with daily disposable tips that are inserted into the nasal cavity for an effective, non–invasive and drug–free way to induce the production of tears.

Heart Pill for CSR

Researchers are leading a groundbreaking study into whether or not a drug used to treat heart failure, eplerenone, could save the sight of patients with recalcitrant central serous chorioretinopathy. 

Thursday, December 01, 2016

VITAMIN D AND DRY EYE

According to this study in Acta Ophthalmologica:

Vitamin D status may be an important factor for dry eye syndrome.

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

TOO MUCH LUTEIN?

This article from the University of Utah discusses how excess lutein supplementation in addition to dietary intake of lutein from greens can lead to crystalline deposits in the macula.  Authors recommend only qualified patients with risk for macular degeneration consider lutein supplementation.


Thursday, November 10, 2016

OCT AND MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

This article in Review of Optometry discusses a link between multiple sclerosis and ganglion cell thinning.

Wednesday, October 26, 2016

CORNEAL CROSS-LINKING SAFE AND EFFECTIVE IN TEENS WITH KERATOCONUS

 This study reported in the Journal of Cornea and External Disease reports that corneal cross-linking is safe and effective at halting the progression of keratoconus in teen patients.

Monday, October 24, 2016

SWIM GOGGLES INCREASE INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE

According to this study in the Journal of Glaucoma swim goggles acutely increase intraocular pressure in the eyeball and may have implications for patients with glaucoma.

Tuesday, October 04, 2016

LINKS BETWEEN DIABETES, TREATMENT, AND GLAUCOMA

From Acta Ophthalmologica: 

To determine the effect of anti-diabetic medication on glaucoma. 

Patients treated with anti-diabetic drugs at any time during the study period had a significantly higher overall relative risk of glaucoma. For patients treated with anti-diabetic drugs, we found an increased hazard for development of glaucoma in patients with diabetic retinopathies and joint complications with diabetic retinopathies. Furthermore, we found that concomitant antihypertensive medications were associated with an increased likelihood of glaucoma overall, while treatment with β-blocker and RAS, in combination, are associated with a significantly lower risk.  Use of anti-diabetic drugs is strongly associated with use of anti-glaucomatous drugs. Diabetic complication as well as concomitant antihypertensive medications affect the risk of glaucoma in patients treated with anti-diabetic drugs.

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

TINTED OR COLORED LENSES APPEAR TO NOT AMELIORATE READING DIFFICULTIES

From Opthalmic and Physiological Optics reports:


There are many anecdotal claims and research reports that coloured lenses and overlays improve reading performance. Here we present the results of a systematic review of this literature and examine the quality of the evidence. 
While many studies report improvements with coloured lenses, the effect size is generally small and/or similar to the improvement found with a placebo condition.
Consistent with previous reviews and advice from several professional bodies, we conclude that the use of coloured lenses or overlays to ameliorate reading difficulties cannot be endorsed and that any benefits reported by individuals in clinical settings are likely to be the result of placebo, practice or Hawthorne effects.

Thursday, September 22, 2016

ROBOTIC EYE SURGERY

According to this University of Oxford News report

University of Oxford surgeons at Oxford's John Radcliffe Hospital have performed the world's first operation inside the eye using a robot.

The device is designed to eliminate unwanted tremors in the surgeon’s hand – such as through their pulse – so tiny surgical manipulations can be safely carried out within the eye.
The robot acts like a mechanical hand with seven independent computer-controlled motors resulting in movements as precise as 1000th of a millimetre in scale.